Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking

According to the 2019 World Drug Report, in 2017, an estimated 271 million people across the world had used drugs in the previous year, while 35 million people were estimated to be suffering from drug use disorders. It was also estimated that, globally, there were 585,000 deaths and 42 million years of “healthy” life lost as a result of the use of drugs. For people with drug use disorders, the availability of and access to treatment services remains limited at the global level. Only one in seven people with drug use disorders will receive treatment each year…

Today, Friday, June 26, is International Day Against Drug Abuse and Illicit Trafficking, also known as World Drug Day. This global observance has been supported by individuals, organizations, and communities all over the world since the United Nations resolved it in 1987. See resolution 42/112 here. This year’s theme is “Better Knowledge for Better Care” which strives to emphasize the importance of combating misinformation and educating on the significance of the world drug issue. Why is this significant? The better we can understand this complex issue and how to treat individuals, the better we can care for them and fight against the drug epidemic as a united society. 

Unfortunately, a big misconception about drug addiction is that it is a choice. This causes many individuals, policy makers, and even some service providers to hold the belief that drug disorders are a moral failure and a crime that needs to be punished. However, according to Mountainside Treatment Center, although the initial decision to misuse a substance may be voluntary, it impairs the way the brain functions in the long-term. It is in fact a multi-factorial health issue, “a primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory, and related circuitry,” (The American Society of Addiction Medicine). These disorders are very complex with factors out of the victim’s control such as genetics, mental health, and environmental factors. Not only does Alvis strongly hold this belief but it was also agreed upon by the Member States in the Outcome document of the 2016 United Nations General Assembly Special Session on the World Drug Problem.

Another myth about addiction is that a victim can quit whenever they want. But as previously mentioned, misusing substances can physically change and critically impact the parts of the brain that deal with judgment, decision-making, learning, memory, and behavior control, (National Institute on Drug Abuse). Willpower by itself is most times not sufficient enough or even safe enough to try to achieve sobriety on ones own. “A person battling a substance abuse problem needs individualized medical and/or clinical treatments, integrative therapies, and mindful practices to restore balance to their life. They also need to develop coping skills and to re-establish support from family, employers, and friends—a crucial part of success in recovery,” (Mountainside Treatment Center). In order to combat the drug issue globally, we all need to change the way we think about drug addiction. To learn more about World Drug Day on the United Nations home page click here. #FactsForSolidarity

There is hope! At Alvis, we offer two judgment free behavioral health and addiction services, one for single women and women with children called Amethyst, and one which is inclusive to both males and females called Recovery Choices. In the Amethyst program, women with and without children can receive treatment for addiction, mental health, and trauma while also receiving supportive housing, job readiness training and placement. What makes the Amethyst program special in particular? It allows women to live with their children and works to reunite and strengthen families. Amethyst takes walk-ins and women seeking help can go directly to the main treatment facility located at 455 E. Mound Street.

Similarly, in the Recovery Choices program, individuals with justice involvement can receive behavioral healthcare and addiction services. Clients can also receive transportation from halfway houses to Alvis reentry centers, where they can take job training courses, receive counseling and individualized treatment plans, and have the opportunity to attain their GED, take university classes, and participate in activities with their family. Also check out our recent post “Recovery Housing at Alvis” to see three specific recovery programs for women called SHINE (Stable Housing to Inspire, Nurture, and Empower), CHAT (Changing Habits, Attitudes and Thoughts), and Belmar.

Alvis is a nonprofit human services agency with over 50 years of experience. We believe in the power of second chances and coming together as one community to affect change. With our reentry, behavioral health, developmental disabilities, workforce development, family and children services, and the community, we can make a lasting 180 impact. Learn more about Alvis and how you can get involved at www.Alvis180.org.

Mental Health Essential Heroes

“Mental Health is Essential Health!”

What Alvis Has to Offer…

Alvis offers two behavioral health service programs: Amethyst and Recovery Choices.

Amethyst is our program for women with and without children seeking addiction, mental health, and trauma-related treatment, family services, supportive housing, and job readiness and placement. What makes the Amethyst program distinct from other treatment programs for women is the fact that it allows women to live with their children, and it specifically works to reunite and strengthen families. Amethyst takes walk-ins, and women are able to go directly to the main treatment facility located at 455 E. Mound Street if they are seeking assistance.

Recovery Choices was created to provide behavioral healthcare services to individuals with justice involvement. Clients receive transportation from halfway houses to reentry centers, where they take job training courses, receive counseling and individualized treatment plans, and have the opportunity to attain their GED, take university classes, and participate in activities with their family. Behavioral health treatment services include:

· Individualized assessment and treatment

· Group counseling

· Cognitive-behavioral therapy

· Medication-assisted treatment (through a partnership with CompDrug)

· Relapse prevention and aftercare

Women in Alvis’ residential reentry programs and in treatment at Recovery Choices may eventually transition to Amethyst to support their long-term recovery.

Thank you, essential mental health and recovery heroes, for your outstanding 24/7 service and support!

Alvis is a nonprofit human services agency with over 50 years of experience providing highly effective treatment programs in Ohio. Our vision is that communities value a person’s potential more than their past. For more information on how Alvis can help you or to learn more about how you can get involved, contact us here.

National Foster Care Month

May is National Foster Care Month!

Some Statistics…

According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, a charitable foundation focused on improving the well-being of American children, in 2018, 424,653 children were in foster care in the US. Childtrends.org defines this as, “a living arrangement for children who a child protective services worker and a court has decided cannot live safely at home.” This source also states that, in 2017, one in three children entered foster care because of parental drug abuse. “Without a caring, loving parent, the statistics about orphans indicate that they are at great risk to crime and homelessness. They don’t graduate from high school or have the ability to attend or succeed in college. Many become teen parents, are under-employed, and lack the skills to build strong relationships and have their own healthy families. These kids are at risk to those who hustle sex for hire, traffickers, extremists and others who prey on the kid’s vulnerabilities,” (kidsave.org). Foster care is a positive service, but it should be used in conjunction with families, not as a replacement. In 2017, the state of Ohio saw one of the largest increases in children entering foster care due to parental drug abuse. April Dirks, an associate professor of social work at Mount Mercy University in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, says, “unfortunately the foster care system is overburdened—there’s not enough families, not enough services. If they’re going to remove the children, the best thing would be immediately treating the parent.” Dirk believes in specialized programs that provide supervised treatment instead of incarceration for people with substance use or mental health issues. These courts can provide parents with the support they need to recover from their addiction and regain custody of their children, (npr.org).

How Alvis Can Help…

Alvis is one such program. Here we bring families together instead of splitting them apart. The Family and Children’s Program serves children and their mothers, with the end goal of bringing families together that have been affected by substance abuse and parental involvement in the criminal justice system. The Family and Children’s Program consists of two components. The first is educational, and the second is in-person contact. Mothers receive parenting education and training. They are taught effective communication and discipline strategies, they learn how to set appropriate boundaries, and they receive guidance to help them understand basic parental responsibilities. Additional community support services are offered for all clients to complement their treatment plans.

These services are also extended to foster guardians caring for children of mothers undergoing treatment.

Moms are then given the opportunity to demonstrate their new skills in part two of the program, during which they are given the opportunity to connect with their children. They write letters, poems and make crafts for their children, which Alvis mails to help maintain the mother-child connection during their stay at Alvis. The mothers also have the opportunity to visit with their children twice each month, every first and third Saturday. Clients come together for a healthy meal, while spending time with their families. Research shows that families who eat meals together are stronger, which is why meals are at the center of family visit days, as caregivers and children join their mothers for a bonding experience. Usually, this also can involve participating in fun activities like games and taking lots of pictures. It’s during these in-person visits that moms get to put into practice the tools and training the program provides. These visits are also where we see the magic of reconnecting families. After graduation, an aftercare phase also allows mothers the opportunity to continue receiving services for up to two years after finishing their treatment through the program.

Alvis is a nonprofit human services agency with over 50 years of experience. We believe in the power of second chances and coming together as one community to affect change. With our reentry, behavioral health, developmental disabilities, workforce development, family and children services, and the community, we can make a lasting 180 impact. Learn more about Alvis and how you can get involved at www.Alvis180.org.