Mental Health Awareness Month

Mental Health Awareness Month is happening right now, and due to the continuing pandemic, people all over the world are experiencing high levels of mental and emotional stress. We have been facing new difficulties when it comes to managing relationships, dealing with loneliness and isolation, increased anxiety and stress, dealing with loss and grief, and so many more issues the pandemic has brought to the forefront of everyone’s minds. That is why this year’s Mental Health Month is focused around the message “you are not alone” and providing helpful ways to improve your situation. If you need some helpful pointers or need a place to start, a toolkit that provides practical tools that anyone can use to help improve their mental health is available for download on Mental Health America’s website.

Mental Health Month is important because it raises awareness not only to mental illnesses, but it also encourages and promotes looking after your own mental wellbeing. Mental health is simply a reflection of our emotional, psychological, and social well-being and it affects how we think, feel, and act, which impacts how we handle situations and make decisions. Meaning, just because you do not have a mental illness, does not mean you do not need to be concerned with your mental health. Perfectly healthy people still go to the doctor to get a physical exam each year in order to make sure they are doing alright and to prevent any health problems, so why not do the same for your mind? Periodically checking in and evaluating your mental health, individually or with the help of a professional, can ensure that you get the support you need to live a happy and healthy life. This can be done by doing a yearly mental health screening or meeting with a therapist based on a schedule that fits your needs. There shouldn’t be a stigma around seeking help for your mental well-being, and that is why we raise awareness every May to ensure that people feel comfortable seeking help.

With everything going on in the world right now, don’t be mad at yourself or discouraged for feeling off. Some days are better than others and you just have to be patient. Be as kind to yourself as you would be to anyone else. Seek help when you need it and help others when you can. Raise awareness this May to help end the stigma around mental health. With that, I leave you with two questions: What are you doing today to make your life easier for yourself? And, if you feel like you are in a good place, what can you do to make life a little better for someone else?

Alvis is a nonprofit dedicated to ending stigmas. We believe in the power of second chances and want all of our clients to know that they are not alone in these unprecedented times. If you wish to join our community, email us at volunteer@alvis180.org.