Child’s Health Day

Child's Health Day Alvis Blog

Child’s Health Day 

Happy Child’s Health Day! Celebrated the first Monday of every October, this day draws attention to ways that we can prioritize children’s health. This day calls upon all of us to assess our own awareness regarding child health and welfare, so we are positive resources for them as they go through their lives. 

Many organizations are involved with children’s health, and the Human Resource and Services Administration (HRSA) specifically offers educational resources for preventative measures that can be taken to combat health issues that children typically face, ranging from fitness to researching healthy diets. The Maternal and Child Health Library similarly promotes nutrition and fitness for children, as well as pregnant women. The HRSA funds and directs the National Survey of Children’s Health, which provides key data to understanding current health trends and issues that children in the nation face. 

At Alvis, we believe in the power of promoting health and wellness for children at an early age. Offering them the resources and know-hows now can make a great impact on their wellbeing later in life. 

Many studies have found the correlation between unhealthiness that tends to result over time from practicing unhealthy habits. While some may find this rather obvious when viewing it from a diet or exercise perspective, others may not realize the impact that drugs and alcohol, especially, can have when abused at a young age. Many of our clients with integrated behavioral health concerns and addiction disorders began using drugs and alcohol from childhood. Drugs and alcohol can greatly impact one’s general health. Even considering how frequent it is for adolescents to drink in college, one study has found a correlation between alcohol and lack of exercise, and general health and cardiovascular health. 

Because drugs, alcohol, and unhealthy choices can generate such a strong impact early in life, Alvis believes in the importance to not only provide services for our clients, but their families and children as well. A person’s potential is more important than their past. This means that we believe in everyone’s power to turn their lives around, and this also means that we believe in the sheer power of potential. Because childhood is such a pivotal moment in one’s development, we strive to educate and provide resources for youth so they may utilize their potential to the fullest. 

Alvis is a nonprofit human services agency with over 50 years of experience providing highly effective treatment programs in Ohio. Our vision is that communities value a person’s potential more than their past. For more information on how Alvis can help you or to learn more about how you can get involved, contact us here.

World Smile Day

World Smile Day Alvis Blog

Happy World Smile Day! Today is an opportunity to spread kindness, positivity, and compassion toward others through the simple act of smiling. In making the world a happier place, we can also make ourselves happier. And if you weren’t already smiling from discovering that today is World Smile Day, you may want to smile even bigger after reading this blog post for National Smile Day.

There’s two days of the year that we get to celebrate the power of the smile! However, today is probably even more of an occasion, because it unites the entire world. Alvis is committed to improving lives, and while many of our clients have gone through true struggle and hardship, our goal is to leave them with the means to make a positive impact on themselves, their families, and their community.

Alvis is a nonprofit human services agency with over 50 years of experience providing highly effective treatment programs in Ohio. Our vision is that communities value a person’s potential more than their past. For more information on how Alvis can help you or to learn more about how you can get involved, contact us here.

National Custodial Worker’s Recognition Day

national custodial worlers recognition day

It’s National Custodial Worker’s Day and we want to say: Thank you!

Developmental disabilities are a group of conditions due to an impairment in physical, learning, language, or behavior areas that usually last throughout a person’s lifetime. That definition may seem strange on National Custodial Worker’s Recognition Day, but give us just a minute to explain.

According to the CSG Justice Center, people with developmental disabilities (DD) are overrepresented in jails and prisons and are more likely to be victimized in correctional settings. In studies completed by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance in 2018, people with DDs represent 4-10% of the prison population, and 40% of jail inmates have at least one disability.

Alvis works directly with DD clients, many who have been involved with the criminal justice system. Our staff, such as home managers and DSPs, works with clients that have developmental disabilities and offers resources and individualized support. Alvis also has two social enterprises that were created with the goal of helping clients build work experience, leadership qualities, and financial stability—one with a focus on DD clients.

So, let’s get back to National Custodial Worker’s Recognition Day. At Alvis, we have the best custodial staff around. Transitions is one of our social enterprises in which correctional and DD Services team members complete custodial services in commercial spaces. The enterprise began in 2010 as a training component for clients and then expanded to become an established business in 2014. At its genesis, Transitions was formed because Alvis needed to hire a custodial team, so workers began cleaning Alvis facilities. But the business began growing and secured its first outside contract with a local nonprofit in 2016. The team continues to clean the Community Treatment Center on Livingston Avenue and the Stella Court offices, earning wages and developing essential workplace skills.

Alvis’s Transitions’ DD Services Team, is committed to aiding the DD population. Camilla Jackson, is a Direct Support Professional (DSP) with Developmental Disability (DD) Services at Alvis who was recently recognized by the Licking County Board of Developmental Disabilities. She won two awards, the Horizon Award and the Constellation Award, for her exceptional effort as a DSP with Alvis. DD services are central to our outreach and we have gotten to be part of so many client success stories.

If you have a commercial space, are in need of cleaning services, and want to make a positive impact in the lives of these individuals, please contact Ramona Swayne by sending an email to ramona.swayne@alvis180.org. Alvis is a nonprofit human services agency with over 50 years of experience providing highly effective treatment programs in Ohio. Our vision is that communities value a person’s potential more than their past. For more information on how Alvis can help you or to learn more about how you can get involved, contact us here

National Bullying Prevention Month

In 2006, the nonprofit PACER founded a campaign called the National Bullying Prevention Month that would take place each October. PACER says, “Historically, bullying had been viewed as “a childhood rite of passage” that “made kids tougher,” but the reality has always been that bullying can leave devastating and often long-term effects such as a loss of self-esteem, increased anxiety, and depression for those involved.”

Alvis is passionate about kids. Our Amethyst Program is focused on helping rehabilitating mothers stay connected with their children. Alvis runs a day camp called SummerQuest that keeps children engaged and safe while their mothers are in treatment, and the Family and Children’s Program offers reading opportunities, games, crafts, and activities bi-weekly. We know that it is important to help parents turn their lives around, but we also want to let the kids know how much we care about them, too.

Being a kid can be hard, and having a parent with justice system involvement can make it even harder.

There are many ways you can get involved in the movement to stop bullying. Many adolescents are sharing their stories by writing an “I Care Because . . .” statement. In these statements, youth around the world share their thoughts and experiences on bullying. One Alvis employee chose to write her own statement.

I used to be a high school teacher. It was almost impossible to see the bullying because everything went on below the surface. But every once in a while, students would tell me their stories. One student said his “friends” kept adding him, then deleting him from a group chat when he wouldn’t do something they asked. One girl sang in a local talent show and the whole room clapped except for a table of kids from her school. Another student was being picked on for being gay and, when she reached out to a school official, was told: “you have to expect that when you put gay pride stickers on your book bag.” I care because kids deserve to be kids.

If you are passionate about ending bullying, PACER leaders say these are the best ways to get involved. We all can help.

Alvis is a nonprofit human services agency with over 50 years of experience providing highly effective treatment programs in Ohio. Our vision is that communities value a person’s potential more than their past. For more information on how Alvis can help you or to learn more about how you can get involved, contact us here.

National Substance Abuse Prevention Month

National Substance Abuse Prevention Month Alvis Blog

Today marks the beginning of October! In addition to cider, pumpkin patches, Halloween, and flannels, this month is also known as National Substance Abuse Prevention Month.

According to the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 90% of people with addictions to nicotine, alcohol, or other drugs begin using substances before age 18, and according to youth.gov, American youth aged 12-20 comprise 11% of the country’s monthly alcohol consumption, and approximately 23 million people over 12 years of age used illicit drugs in 2010. In many cases, addiction begins early in life.

Many of Alvis’ clients have co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health disorders. In the past, a number of them have asserted that one of the most important things they’ve learned through treatment is that they simply aren’t alone. Solidarity and understanding are key in facilitating recovery from substance abuse, but what about prevention?

In terms of Alvis, one of the primary ways we aid in substance abuse prevention is by treating our clients as people without stigmatized pasts, because of how early addiction may develop. We believe that a person’s potential is more important than their past, and our vision is of a future when communities believe this, too. We can decrease substance abuse in our communities through continuing reentry programs like Alvis, which shatter the boundaries between those with justice system involvement and the greater community. By reducing stigmas, advocating for support systems, and shifting attitudes surrounding the negative effects of addiction, we can make it easier for individuals suffering from addiction or substance abuse to seek help.

Alvis also takes measures to specifically prevent substance abuse through our Family and Children’s Program. Across different areas of Alvis, the Family and Children’s Program works to reunite families, motivate youth to pursue education and success, and maintain transparency about the harmful, life-altering effects that drugs can do to one’s life.

While most of the time, Alvis is known for its reentry and recovery programs, many of which include individuals with substance abuse disorders, we also advocate for preventing it from developing in the first place by emphasizing the consequences and impact substance abuse can have, as well as working to reduce the stigmas that prevent healthy discussion and openness from taking place.

It is much harder to face addictions or co-occurring behavioral health disorders alone.

Alvis is a nonprofit human services agency with over 50 years of experience providing highly effective treatment programs in Ohio. Our vision is that communities value a person’s potential more than their past. For more information on how Alvis can help you or to learn more about how you can get involved, contact us here.

Healthy Aging Month

Healthy Aging Month Alvis Blog

September is Healthy Aging Month and, according to Healthy Aging Magazine, is one of the best times to offset the effects of aging. The healthy aging mogul encourages seniors to get out and get active. Carolyn Worthington, publisher of the Healthy Aging multi-media platform suggests that seniors “use September as the motivation to take stock of where you’ve been, [and] what you really would like to do.” 

In celebration of Healthy Aging Month, the Alvis team has compiled a list of activities for seniors to get involved in, right here in Columbus.

1) Take a guided or self-guided tour, walk, or hike through the Columbus Metro Parks. Whether it’s a walk through Inniswood Metro Gardens on October 6th or the Nature Hike at Three Creeks on October 18th, there are activities for almost every week of the year at one of the Metro Parks locations. Check out the various locations and dates here.

2) Go on a Walk With A Doc! Walk With a Doc takes place at Highbanks Metro Park in Columbus every Saturday through November, and then switches to the Polaris Mall through April. The program, founded by Doctor David Sabgir, provides “free blood pressure checks, healthy snacks, recipes, health information to make better lifestyle changes, and opportunities to talk with local physicians.”

3) Become a member of Columbus Recreation and Parks’s senior program. Columbus Recreation and Parks offers a 50+ membership for free that allows senior members access to senior fitness centers and sports programs. 

4) Get your steps in at a local festival! There are dozens of fall festival and fairs going on from September to November. Whether it’s at Chalk the Block or at Ohio Gourd Fest, there are tons of venues where you can honor your body with movement. Check the list out here

5) Attend a gym. SilverSneakers, a fitness program for seniors, is included in many Medicare Advantage Plans. It allows members access to gyms all over Columbus at free or reduced rates. Check eligibility here

Wherever your interests lie, there are plenty of ways to stay active this fall. Something as small as stretching or walking can make all the difference in your physical health. Alvis knows that seniors are important to the community, which is why we spent multiple days teaming up with senior events over the summer. We had our inaugural Wellness 180 Event, which focused on staying healthy in the workplace and participated in National Senior Health and Fitness Day as well as the Senior Expo Event. We continue to be an equal opportunity employer that supports and employs seniors and veterans because we know diverse perspectives and experiences are crucial to building a team that makes a 180-degree impact. 

Alvis is a nonprofit human services agency with over 50 years of experience providing highly effective treatment programs in Ohio. Our vision is that communities value a person’s potential more than their past. For more information on how Alvis can help you or to learn more about how you can get involved, contact us here.

2019 ASPIRE Award

Nature’s Touch Landscaping and Lawn Care is an Alvis-operated landscaping/lawn care enterprise, which was recently nominated for the 2019 Aspire Award. The award is, as Ramona Wheeler, Managing Director of Social Enterprises at Alvis, puts it, “kind of like the Emmy’s of social enterprise.”

The Aspire Awards are organized by Metropreneur and SocialVentures, online organizations that promote social enterprise and nonprofits in Central Ohio. The ceremony, set to happen September 18th, will honor social enterprises that are perceived to be impactful in these communities.

Wheeler believes that the nomination has helped validate the work that nonprofit employees do, which usually goes unrecognized. As a 14-year Alvis veteran, she feels a bit of that validation herself. “Personally, it means that Alvis has taken a big step in a new direction [in] the social enterprise initiative,” she says. “To have the buy in, even from our board, to endeavor in this space, and then to fast-forward to today being a finalist for social enterprise of the year, it’s amazing.”

In 2015, Alvis was one of only ten nonprofits that went through a process with the Better Business Bureau and SocialVentures to establish a credential for social enterprise. The thought process was that building credibility would help the community efficiently measure Alvis’s social impact.

Another focus for Wheeler’s team was recruitment. She wanted to emphasize finding candidates from residential pools who were ready to represent the organization’s goals and purpose. “Any human resources professional knows that a business cannot exist without its biggest asset, which is its people,” she says.

With this in mind, Nature’s Touch offers a competitive $11.85 hourly wage as a base pay because, as Wheeler puts it, it puts the company in competition with others in the landscaping industry and promotes the value of the worker and the organization.

But Alvis’s goal for social enterprise isn’t just about getting clients into the workforce. It is also about creating a community. “A lot of our clients while they are in our program, may still have some personal issues and some trepidation about being ready for work,” Wheeler says. “We are like a baby step. So, [employees] have work that has to be accomplished… but at the same time, when life gets hard, we are still part of Alvis.”

Wheeler calls this a holistic approach to employment. “We try to be a part of their progress so that even when they are out of our residential program, we make sure they are still connected and we are still there for them.”

As Columbus becomes a growing hub of social enterprise, entrepreneurs are finding ways to promote good. On September 18th at 6 pm, the Roosevelt Coffee House (a social enterprise business itself), will host a panel discussion of independent entrepreneurs who employ those who have been in the incarcerated, those with disabilities, and those working through rehabilitation programs.